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Last week we said that tongue twisters are good practice for pronunciation and articulation and I promised you some Slovak language tongue twisters, but first I probably should tell you something about the Slovak Republic, also known as Slovakia. Incidentally, if you are looking for any Slovak translation services, let us know.

Slovakia is a member state of the Europe Union and bordered by the Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine, Hungary and Austria. Until 1993, the Slovak Republic was joined with the Czech Republic and these countries were known as Czechoslovakia. Slovakia today has a population of over five million people and the capital is Bratislava. Bratislava is also the largest city, followed by the second largest city, called Košice. Slovakia is a very mountainous country and the Carpathian Mountains protrude through it.

The Slovak language is a Slavic language and is different to the Czech language, even though there are some similarities. Slovak and Czech are mutually intelligible.

(Slovak is not to be confused with Slovene or Slovenian, which is the language of the Republic of Slovenia, which was part of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.)

The following tongue twisters are well known twisters – „jazykolamy“ – in Slovakia and are applied at acting schools. „Jazykolamy“ means tongue breakers, like „Zungenbrecher“ in the German language.


Dolár, Libra, Rubeľ, Dolár, Libra, Rubeľ, etc.

Dollar, Pound, Rouble, Dollar, Pound, Rouble, etc.


Pštros s pštrosicou šli s pštrosíčaťom na pštrosiu prechádzku.

A male ostrich and a female ostrich went for an ostrich walk with their ostrich baby.


Koloso, koleso, okolesilo si sa. Železo, železo, oželezilo si sa.

Paddle-wheel, paddle-wheel, you „paddled around“. Iron, iron, you „ironed“.


Keď naolejujem lampu, nenaolejujem linoleum. Keď naolejujem linoleum, nenaolejujem lampu.

If I oil the lamp, I cannot oil the linoleum. If I oil the linoleum, I cannot oil the lamp.


Pes spí, psi spia, pes spí, psi spia, etc.

Dog sleeps, dogs sleep, dog sleeps, dogs sleep, etc.


Pán kaplan v kapli plakal.

Chaplain wept in the chapel.


Šašo suší osušku.

A clown is drying a bath towel.


Strč prst skrz krk.

Plunge a finger through the neck.


Víly z vily vence vili a psy na ne vyli z vily.

Fairies from a villa weave crowns and dogs from a villa bark on them.


Jeleňovi pivo nelej!

Do not serve beer to a reindeer!


Poslali ma naši k vašim,
aby prišli vaši k našim,
ak neprídu vaši k našim,
tak že prídu naši k vašim.

My parents send me to your parents
that your parents shall come to my parents,
if your parents do not come to my parents
my parents will come to your parents.

The tongue twisters do not sound very meaningful. Fortunately, tongue twisters are not about meaningfulness, but about the difficulty to repeat them for a few times consecutively.

If you practice them (they do not have to be foreign language tongue twisters) from time to time, you will certainly realise how easy they are to pronounce after some practice.

Good luck!

Tongue Twisters

Last week we said that tongue twisters are good practice for pronunciation and articulation and I promised you some Slovak language tongue twisters, but first I probably should tell you something about the Slovak Republic, also known as Slovakia.

Slovakia is a member state of the Europe Union and bordered by the Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine, Hungary and Austria. Until 1993, the Slovak Republic was joined with the Czech Republic and these countries were known as Czechoslovakia. Slovakia today has a population of over five milion people and the capital is Bratislava. Bratislava is also the largest city, followed by the second largest city, called Košice. Slovakia is a very mountainous country and the Carpathian Mountains protrude through it.

The Slovak language is a Slavic language and is different to the Czech language, even though there are some similarities. Slovak and Czech are mutually intelligible.

(Slovak is not to be confused with Slovene or Slovenian, which is the language of the Republic of Slovenia, which was part of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.)

The following tongue twisters are well known twisters – „jazykolamy“ – in Slovakia and are applied at acting schools. „Jazykolamy“ means tongue breakers, like „Zungenbrecher“ in the German language.


Dolár, Libra, Rubeľ, Dolár, Libra, Rubeľ, etc.

Dollar, Pound, Rouble, Dollar, Pound, Rouble, etc.


Pštros s pštrosicou šli s pštrosíčaťom na pštrosiu prechádzku.

A male ostrich and a female ostrich went for an ostrich walk with their ostrich baby.


Koloso, koleso, okolesilo si sa. Železo, železo, oželezilo si sa.

Paddle-wheel, paddle-wheel, you „paddled around“. Iron, iron, you „ironed“.


Keď naolejujem lampu, nenaolejujem linoleum. Keď naolejujem linoleum, nenaolejujem lampu.

If I oil the lamp, I cannot oil the linoleum. If I oil the linoleum, I cannot oil the lamp.


Pes spí, psi spia, pes spí, psi spia, etc.

Dog sleeps, dogs sleep, dog sleeps, dogs sleep, etc.


Pán kaplan v kapli plakal.

Chaplain wept in the chapel.


Šašo suší osušku.

A clown is drying a bath towel.


Strč prst skrz krk.

Plunge a finger through the neck.


Víly z vily vence vili a psy na ne vyli z vily.

Fairies from a villa weave crowns and dogs from a villa bark on them.


Jeleňovi pivo nelej!

Do not serve beer to a reindeer!


Poslali ma naši k vašim,
aby prišli vaši k našim,
ak neprídu vaši k našim,
tak že prídu naši k vašim.

My parents send me to your parents
that your parents shall come to my parents,
if your parents do not come to my parents
my parents will come to your parents.

The tongue twisters do not sound very meaningful. Fortunately, tongue twisters are not about meaningfulness, but about the difficulty to repeat them for a few times consecutively.

If you practice them (they do not have to be foreign language tongue twisters) from time to time, you will certainly realise how easy they are to pronounce after some practice.

Good luck!

Tongue Twisters

Last week we said that tongue twisters are good practice for pronunciation and articulation and I promised you some Slovak language tongue twisters, but first I probably should tell you something about the Slovak Republic, also known as Slovakia.

Slovakia is a member state of the Europe Union and bordered by the Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine, Hungary and Austria. Until 1993, the Slovak Republic was joined with the Czech Republic and these countries were known as Czechoslovakia. Slovakia today has a population of over five milion people and the capital is Bratislava. Bratislava is also the largest city, followed by the second largest city, called Košice. Slovakia is a very mountainous country and the Carpathian Mountains protrude through it.

The Slovak language is a Slavic language and is different to the Czech language, even though there are some similarities. Slovak and Czech are mutually intelligible.

(Slovak is not to be confused with Slovene or Slovenian, which is the language of the Republic of Slovenia, which was part of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.)

The following tongue twisters are well known twisters – „jazykolamy“ – in Slovakia and are applied at acting schools. „Jazykolamy“ means tongue breakers, like „Zungenbrecher“ in the German language.


Dolár, Libra, Rubeľ, Dolár, Libra, Rubeľ, etc.

Dollar, Pound, Rouble, Dollar, Pound, Rouble, etc.


Pštros s pštrosicou šli s pštrosíčaťom na pštrosiu prechádzku.

A male ostrich and a female ostrich went for an ostrich walk with their ostrich baby.


Koloso, koleso, okolesilo si sa. Železo, železo, oželezilo si sa.

Paddle-wheel, paddle-wheel, you „paddled around“. Iron, iron, you „ironed“.


Keď naolejujem lampu, nenaolejujem linoleum. Keď naolejujem linoleum, nenaolejujem lampu.

If I oil the lamp, I cannot oil the linoleum. If I oil the linoleum, I cannot oil the lamp.


Pes spí, psi spia, pes spí, psi spia, etc.

Dog sleeps, dogs sleep, dog sleeps, dogs sleep, etc.


Pán kaplan v kapli plakal.

Chaplain wept in the chapel.


Šašo suší osušku.

A clown is drying a bath towel.


Strč prst skrz krk.

Plunge a finger through the neck.


Víly z vily vence vili a psy na ne vyli z vily.

Fairies from a villa weave crowns and dogs from a villa bark on them.


Jeleňovi pivo nelej!

Do not serve beer to a reindeer!


Poslali ma naši k vašim,
aby prišli vaši k našim,
ak neprídu vaši k našim,
tak že prídu naši k vašim.

My parents send me to your parents
that your parents shall come to my parents,
if your parents do not come to my parents
my parents will come to your parents.

The tongue twisters do not sound very meaningful. Fortunately, tongue twisters are not about meaningfulness, but about the difficulty to repeat them for a few times consecutively.

If you practice them (they do not have to be foreign language tongue twisters) from time to time, you will certainly realise how easy they are to pronounce after some practice.

Good luck!

Tongue Twisters

Last week we said that tongue twisters are good practice for pronunciation and articulation and I promised you some Slovak language tongue twisters, but first I probably should tell you something about the Slovak Republic, also known as Slovakia.

Slovakia is a member state of the Europe Union and bordered by the Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine, Hungary and Austria. Until 1993, the Slovak Republic was joined with the Czech Republic and these countries were known as Czechoslovakia. Slovakia today has a population of over five milion people and the capital is Bratislava. Bratislava is also the largest city, followed by the second largest city, called Košice. Slovakia is a very mountainous country and the Carpathian Mountains protrude through it.

The Slovak language is a Slavic language and is different to the Czech language, even though there are some similarities. Slovak and Czech are mutually intelligible.

(Slovak is not to be confused with Slovene or Slovenian, which is the language of the Republic of Slovenia, which was part of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.)

The following tongue twisters are well known twisters – „jazykolamy“ – in Slovakia and are applied at acting schools. „Jazykolamy“ means tongue breakers, like „Zungenbrecher“ in the German language.


Dolár, Libra, Rubeľ, Dolár, Libra, Rubeľ, etc.

Dollar, Pound, Rouble, Dollar, Pound, Rouble, etc.


Pštros s pštrosicou šli s pštrosíčaťom na pštrosiu prechádzku.

A male ostrich and a female ostrich went for an ostrich walk with their ostrich baby.


Koloso, koleso, okolesilo si sa. Železo, železo, oželezilo si sa.

Paddle-wheel, paddle-wheel, you „paddled around“. Iron, iron, you „ironed“.


Keď naolejujem lampu, nenaolejujem linoleum. Keď naolejujem linoleum, nenaolejujem lampu.

If I oil the lamp, I cannot oil the linoleum. If I oil the linoleum, I cannot oil the lamp.


Pes spí, psi spia, pes spí, psi spia, etc.

Dog sleeps, dogs sleep, dog sleeps, dogs sleep, etc.


Pán kaplan v kapli plakal.

Chaplain wept in the chapel.


Šašo suší osušku.

A clown is drying a bath towel.


Strč prst skrz krk.

Plunge a finger through the neck.


Víly z vily vence vili a psy na ne vyli z vily.

Fairies from a villa weave crowns and dogs from a villa bark on them.


Jeleňovi pivo nelej!

Do not serve beer to a reindeer!


Poslali ma naši k vašim,
aby prišli vaši k našim,
ak neprídu vaši k našim,
tak že prídu naši k vašim.

My parents send me to your parents
that your parents shall come to my parents,
if your parents do not come to my parents
my parents will come to your parents.

The tongue twisters do not sound very meaningful. Fortunately, tongue twisters are not about meaningfulness, but about the difficulty to repeat them for a few times consecutively.

If you practice them (they do not have to be foreign language tongue twisters) from time to time, you will certainly realise how easy they are to pronounce after some practice.

Good luck!

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