Do you know how many different languages Ed Sheeran has sung in?

Do you know how many different languages Ed Sheeran has sung in?

It’s no secret that Ed Sheeran wrote his latest album while travelling the world and soaking up different cultures and styles of music. But he went further than that. He also isn’t afraid to delve into the world of languages either. What’s most impressive is his commitment to getting the foreign lyrics and their pronunciation spot on, and he has previously said he would only sing in other languages if he could do it properly.

However, it’s not just on his latest album that he tries his hand at other languages, but in songs recorded before and after too. Take a look below!

Twi – “Boa Me” & “Bibia Be Ye Ye”

Last year Ed teamed up with Highlife and Afrobeats artist Fuse ODG to create a new track called “Boa Me”, where Sheeran sings the entire chorus in flawless Twi – a dialect from Ghana. The song was actually written at Fuse ODG’s house in Ghana with his friends, and Ed has described it as “probably the most fun I’ve had writing a song”. The song peaked at #52 in the UK charts. While it didn’t reach the top 40, this upbeat track is definitely worth a listen!

This actually isn’t even the first time that the Twi language has featured on an Ed Sheeran track! The song/lyrics “Bibia be ye ye” from the Deluxe version of his latest album ÷ (Divide), is also Twi, and means “all will be well”. Fuse ODG was also involved in the writing of this song which peaked at #18 on the UK chart.

Spanish – “Barcelona”

“Barcelona” is another song which appears on the Deluxe version of ÷ (Divide), and this time Ed takes on Spanish at the end of the song which includes the following lyrics:

Mi niña, te amo mi cariño

Mamacita, rica

Sí tú, te adoro, señorita

Los otros, viva la vida

Siempre vida, Barcelona

In case you’re wondering, “Mamacita” roughly translates as “hot mama”!

This is another feel-good song which tries to incorporate the atmosphere in this amazing city. It charted at #12 in the UK charts.

Italian – Perfect Symphony

Spanish isn’t the only language from mainland Europe that Ed sings in! After the incredible success of “Perfect” (initially debuting at #4, before climbing to #3), and then “Perfect Duet” with Beyoncé which propelled the song to #1 in the charts, Sheeran collaborated with Italian legend Andrea Bocelli to create a more operatic version, known as “Perfect Symphony”. Bocelli translated part of the song into Italian but it’s not just him who sings the Italian, with Ed also joining in. Incidentally this is also the first song in which Ed collaborated with his brother Matthew, himself a classical composer, and whose string section appears on both this and the original version.

Gaelic – Thinking Out Loud

Ed is clearly in touch with his Irish roots, spending plenty of time across the Irish sea with his family, having some tattoos in Gaelic, and also musically with two Irish-influenced songs “Galway Girl” and “Nancy Mulligan” appearing on ÷. But he went even further back in 2015 by recording a Gaelic translation of one of his biggest hits “Thinking Out Loud”. It was recorded especially to be included on the album CEOL 2016, which was that year’s album from Conradh na Gaeilge (an organisation promoting the Irish language) and their Irish-language radio station Raidió Rí Rá, produced for “Irish week” (Seachtain na Gaeilge), featuring Gaelic tracks from the best Ireland has to offer.

The whole song is translated into, and sung in Gaelic, which I think we’ll all agree is pretty impressive! I’ll leave it up to native Gaelic speakers to let us know how good his pronunciation is, but I’m sure, as with the other songs, he wouldn’t have released it if he wasn’t able to get it right, as is his great professionalism and his respect for other languages and cultures.

Keep up the great work Ed!

How Lingua Translations can help with your sporting needs

How Lingua Translations can help with your sporting needs

How Lingua Translations can help with your sporting needs

Here at Lingua Translations, one of the many services we offer is language services in the field of sports (“field” – get it?!). We have provided a range of services – mainly to sports teams and agencies – and perhaps we could help you next!

Whether it’s translating articles to broaden to global appeal of major football clubs, to interpreting for new players, or even teaching them English, we are here to help you reach your goals (I’ll stop with the puns soon) with any sporting matter, no matter how big or small.

Sports translation? We got this!

Professional-sport-translation-300x300We translate and proofread match reports and articles for one of the biggest clubs in world football right now, while also translating promo’s involving a major betting agency and various teams including not only a Premier League winning club, but also a 5-times European cup winning team too! Besides translating articles, reports and promos, we’ve also been asked to translate medical documents needed for a player’s transfer. This is of course top-secret stuff as any leak could jeopardise the transfer, or alert other teams who might try and snap the player up instead! With Lingua Translations, you are safe in the knowledge that your documents remain 100% confidential.

We also have experience with interpreting for major football clubs as well, including helping them interpret during football camps for kids (run by another Premier League and Champions League winning club), as well as helping players during their medical before a transfer. Once the players had signed, we also offered them English language lessons in our office to help them settle. For players coming to a new country and culture, this can be a great help!

While a lot of our recent sports work has revolved around football (or “soccer”, for our American clients!), our linguists also have experience and knowledge in a variety of sports and related subjects for example things like cycling and athletics, but also things such as physiotherapy for sports injuries.

Whatever your sporting-related language requirements – whether you are an internationally supported sports team, or an individual amateur athlete – why not get in touch? You can visit our website at www.Lingua-Translations.com, or you can send us an email at info@lingua-translations.com.

What could you interpret? A birth?

What could you interpret? A birth?

Could you interpret a birth?

These days interpreters are needed for everything! As an agency we get various requests for legal proceedings, events, interviews, football players, medical issues… the list goes on. The range of needs for interpreting is immense. But what could you interpret? Legal can be a difficult area to interpret as you can be dealing with some very technical and sensitive situations. What about interpreting a labour? Could you do that?

 

birthI was casually watching ‘one born every minute’ (preparing myself for when I’ll be in labour in July!) and there was a Persian family requiring an interpreter for the birth of their child. It made me think, could I interpret something like that?! It is a special time in the parents lives and you’d be there helping them understand what is going on, and helping the doctors and midwifes understand how mum is feeling.

To give a bit of history of the family

They had two children in Iran through caesarean under general anaesthetic. They then moved to Britain and were learning English and became pregnant with their third child. Although, between them they could understand a lot of what the midwifes were saying, there was still a language barrier. An interpreter was needed to help the labour run smoothly.

 

They were planning on having a caesarean for the 3rd child, but unlike in Iran, we do not use general anaesthetic for the procedure. As you can imagine the woman was a little worried about being awake for the procedure. The interpreter was there to help them understand what the consultants, doctors and midwifes needed the mum and dad to understand, along with the mum being able to explain how she feels and what was happening with her.

From a language point of view, the conversation would’ve been easy for any medical trained interpreter to assist with. The difficult part for the interpreter would’ve to be present during what it a very special and unique time for the parents. Especially considering in Iran the fathers are not normally allowed to be present for the births.

Sometimes we forget how vast a profession interpreting can be. On the news we only see interpreters in a legal point of view, but there are so many areas of life where interpreters are needed. So, my question is: what could you interpret? At Lingua Translations we aim to find the best suited interpreter for of our clients. Could you interpret something as unique as a labour?

Europe, the UK’s doorstep, but not for much longer

Europe, the UK’s doorstep, but not for much longer

Europe, the UK’s doorstep, but not for much longer

Are you like me? Comfortable being first off, a British citizen and secondly, a European? Knowing that Europe is right on your doorstep, always going to be there. One of those places you’ll eventually make it to but before that time comes, you’re way too excited by the bigger, further undoubtedly incredible countries, cities and landmarks of the world. Well, time’s up I’m afraid. Yep, time to stop the gallivanting to the other side of the world and time to buy a quick and easy flight to Europe this summer. Time is ticking and it’s quite frankly your last chance to travel in simplicity and more importantly, stress-free around all the extraordinary European countries that you’ve always taken for granted.

Not so simple trip anymore?

Brexit – that dreaded word. The word that must not be said. Well at least in my opinion anyway (but that’s another blog, for another time!). We are so very close to being stripped of our entitlement to travel anywhere in the EU and instead, become ‘third country nationals’ with no automatic right of admission. 2019 could see the introduction of ETIAS (European Travel Information and Authorisation System) in the aim of strengthening the EU’s external borders. Once Britain leaves the EU, UK citizens will be covered by the same rules as, for example, Americans and Australians. Each traveller will be required to have an ETIAS, a halfway house between unrestricted entry and the onerous process of applying for a full visa.

 

Don’t worry – this blog isn’t all about the future intentions of Brexit. It’s about something a lot more fun and that’s HOLIDAYING. And it looks to me as if all your holiday plans for 2018 are sorted. Check out my list of the top 11 European destinations you MUST visit this summer. Or any time the year, actually. Pack your bags, put the rest of the world on hold and set off to EUROPE.

So here goes, just like they do it on the television – the destinations on my list for 2018 are, in no particular order:

 

  1. The Colosseum – Rome, Italy

Oh, yes. When in Rome, do as the Romans do. And what’s more quintessentially Roman than the Flavian Amphitheatre? While its history may be brutal, the Colosseum’s structure is one to behold, built of concrete and sand, in its day, it could hold up to 55,000 people! It also takes the top spot as the most famous tourist attraction in Rome. Well worth a visit.

 

  1. The Eiffel Tower – Paris, France

French Translations Eiffel Tower 176 × 287One of Paris’ most visited attractions, the Eiffel Tower takes the top spot of most tourists visiting the City of Lights. And, with the structure standing at 342 metres in height, it is hard to miss. The tower actually welcomes around 7 million visitors each year which gives it the title of the most visited paid-for monument in the world.

  1. Sagrada Familia – Barcelona, Spain

Whilst Barcelona’s impressive Catholic Cathedral still stands unfinished, you can’t deny that the Sagrada Familia is pretty spectacular. Designed by architect, Antonio Gaudi, the cathedral has now entered its last phase of construction with the tallest of its new towers set to reach a whopping 172 metres! After 133 years in construction, if you’re waiting to see the finished piece, it is on track to be finished in 2026 which will also mark the centenary of Gaudi’s death.

  1. Leaning Tower of Pisa – Pisa, Italy

Poor foundations it may have, but if this tower was up right it wouldn’t be as appealing, right? This is one human error we can certainly be thankful for. The Leaning Tower of Pisa is a tourist hotspot, and you can be sure to see hordes of people trying to get that one picture showing them propping up the tower. Now safely anchored into the ground, you can even take a walk up the tower, crazy!

  1. Brandenburg Gate – Berlin, Germany

One of the best-known landmarks in Germany, Brandenburg Gate, is a symbol of peace that was built in the eighteenth century, and it’s certainly something to look at. Originally, the designer’s concept for the gate was a ‘Friedenstor’, or victory arch, as we may know it. Through Berlin’s varied history it has also shared its existence as a political icon and a symbol of a divided city. Luckily, we can now enjoy the Brandenburg Gate as a symbol of unity. It’s certainly a unique and memorable place to visit during your time in Berlin.

  1. Ancient City Walls – Dubrovnik, Croatia

Considered the most magnificent fortification monument in Europe, a walk around the walls of Dubrovnik are sure to be a highlight of your trip to this spectacular coastal city. Stretching around the city, the walls reach over 2km in distance. So, if you’ve indulged in some of that delicious Dubrovnik seafood, it’s the perfect excuse to fit in a post-lunch stroll.

  1. The Acropolis – Athens, Greece

Mention an 80ft hill with a flat top and it may not sound overly impressive. Mention its name, and it suddenly becomes one of the most iconic monuments in Europe. The Acropolis, especially the Parthenon, are by far the most characteristic sights to see in Athens. A must on any trip to the city. It is considered to symbol the beginning of Western civilisation and the Parthenon was even dedicated to the patron goddess of Athens, Athena. Athena who is also the goddess of wisdom making it a real treat for culture enthusiasts and historians alike.

  1. Duomo – Milan, Italy

An exceptionally large and elaborate Gothic cathedral found in the main square of Milan, the Duomo di Milano is one of the most famous buildings in Europe. It is the largest Gothic cathedral and the second largest Catholic cathedral in the world and its dazzling white facade is definitely worth a photograph. It took nearly six centuries to complete.

  1. Northern Lights – Scandinavia/Iceland

Icelandic-Translations 2048 × 1275It’s cold and it can be expensive. But there is no doubt that taking a trip to Europe’s northern reaches with the aim of seeing the aurora borealis appeals to millions of us. Head far out to the wilderness as possible due to light pollution making the green and blue lights less visible. As well as the jaw-dropping sky spectacle – take the opportunity to go mushing, sledding and snowshoeing and savour the deep silence of the frozen landscapes.

  1. Red Square – Moscow, Russia

Stepping onto Red Square never ceases to inspire. For starters, the vast rectangular stretch of cobblestones, surrounded by architectural marvels, is an imposing sight, right at the very heart of Moscow. This celebrated Red Square, 400m-by-150m, separates the Kremlin, the former royal citadel and now the official residence of the President of Russia, from a historic merchant quarter known as Kitay-gorod. The word ‘krasnaya’ in the name means ‘red’ now, but in old Russian was the word for ‘beautiful’. The square lives up to the original meaning of its name. Furthermore, it evokes an incredible sense of awe to stroll across a place where so much of Russian history unfolded.

  1. Lake Bled – Slovenia

With its emerald-green lake, picture-postcard church on an islet, a medieval castle clinging to a rocky cliff and some of the highest peaks of the Julian Alps and the Karavanke as backdrops, Bled is Slovenia’s most popular resort. Drawing everyone from honeymooners lured by the over-the-top romantic setting to backpackers, who come for the hiking, biking, water sports and canyoning possibilities.

And just to spoil you, here’s a couple of extra favourites:

  • Venice – Italy
  • The Charles Bridge – Prague, Czech Republic
  • Pamukkale – Turkey
  • Seville – Spain (for Holy Week)
  • The Matterhorn – Switzerland
  • Chateau de Chenoncheau – Loire Valley, France
  • The Atlantic Road – Norway
  • Tuscany – Italy
  • The Alhambra – Spain
  • The black beaches – Iceland
  • Mezquita de Cordoba – Spain
  • Versailles – France
  • Ephesus – Turkey
  • Pompeii – Italy
Raining cats and dogs

Raining cats and dogs

Raining Cats and Dogs

 

raining cats and dogs 181 × 174You might’ve seen my earlier blog about our fixations with weather. This got me thinking – are we the only nation? But more importantly, do other nations have some random way of saying its raining quite heavily out there. I’ve checked- Britain is not the only country to get heavy downpours – just a shame most of ours happen in summer.

 

So, here’s what I found!

 

Cats and Dogs is a very English way of saying its raining. Obviously, you could technically say raining cats and dogs in any language- but would people understand what you are trying to say? Here’s how some of the rest of the world would say it:

 

The Catalans have gone with something just a weird, but without the animal cruelty: Està plovent a bots i barrals (barrels and casks)

 

The French have a few variations with what they would say: Il pleut des grenouilles / à seaux / comme vache qui pisse – meaning raining frogs (bit of a stereotype there!), buckets and a random one, like a pissing cow……  Never to be outdone by the English clearly!

 

The Greeks went with the simple Βρέχει καρεκλοπόδαρα (Brékhei kareklopódara) – It’s raining chair legs. Just as bizarre as the pets… but where is the rest of the chair?

 

Iceland go with the more apocalyptic version of Það rignir eld og brennustein – raining fire and brimstone. Think I’d prefer cats falling on me than brimstone!

 

Korea seems to be one of the more sensible countries when describing very bad rain: 비가 억수같이 쏟아진다 – Rain is pouring down like a torrential downpour. Hitting the nail on the head there! No confusion!

 

Not sure how often the Spaniards would use this version but I found it interesting enough. Estan lloviendo hasta maridos It’s even raining husbands. When the rain is that bad, it brings husbands with it!

 

I’m Welsh second language – but when speaking about weather down south, I’ve never heard these versions, but they made me chuckle! Maybe I was hanging out with the wrong people! Mae hi’n bwrw hen wragedd a ffyn / cyllyll a ffyrc – Also known as It’s raining old ladies and sticks / knives and forks

 

The Military Alphabet | Lingua Translations

The Military Alphabet | Lingua Translations

The Military Alphabet

 

Many people know the military alphabet, maybe not all of it, but a fair few of them! From my time working in a government office, you need to know this alphabet. This alphabet does differ a bit from the American one. In America, Sierra can be someone’s name: Ciara. So, they may use Sugar instead of Sierra. Guessing they are not overly fond of the work Yankee either, so they tend to use Yellow.

A few days my husband ‘mocked’ me for spelling my name like this. ‘J for Juliet, U for Uniform, L for Lima, I for India, A for Alfa. He reminded me that my name is technically Julia, so why not J for Julia, not Juliet. Well… that sounds crazy to me! It’s always J for Juliet! If not, I might as well as be Phoebe!

“P as in Phoebe

H as in hoebe

O as in oebe

E as in ebe

B as in b-be

and E as in… ‘ello there, mate!”

Granted, this is amazing! And I wish I had the guts to stand there and say my name like that, but I have been trained in the military alphabet, not the Phoebe alphabet!

 

The alphabet:

AAlfaJJulietSSierra
BBravoKKiloTTango
CCharlieLLimaUUniform
DDeltaMMikeVVictor
EEchoNNovemberWWhiskey
FFoxtrotOOscarXX-Ray
GGolfPPapaYYankee
HHotelQQuebecZZulu
IIndiaRRomeo

 

 

What about those pesky people who use random words? Anyone who has worked in a call centre has more than likely heard these:

A for Aisle

C for Cue

G for Gnome

K for Knight

S for See

Y for You

 

You see where I’m going with this!! There are some words where you can attempt the ‘sarcastic alphabet’ and absolutely confuse the person you are speaking to.